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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/10434

Title: Reduced Sulphur Compounds in Ambient Air and in Emissions from Wastewater Clarifiers at a Kraft Pulp Mill
Authors: Liang, Chien Chi Victor
Advisor: Jia, Charles Q.
Catalan, Lionel
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: Environmental Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Reduced Sulphur Compound
Issue Date: 25-Jul-2008
Abstract: Small quantities of reduced sulphur compounds (RSCs) emitted from Kraft pulp mills can affect air quality due to low odour thresholds. Chromatographic methods were developed for individual RSCs at ppt to ppb concentrations. Analyses of ambient air samples showed that while H2S, CH3SH, DMS and DMDS were linked to the pulp mill, the majority of COS and CS2 was due to other sources unrelated to the mill. The fluxes of individual RSCs from kraft wastewater clarifiers were quantified for the first time. DMDS and DMS were the major RSCs emitted from the primary and secondary clarifiers, respectively. RSC fluxes were one to three orders of magnitude higher at the primary clarifier than at the secondary one. Clarifier emissions were, however, insignificant compared to point sources in the mill. Statistically significant correlations were found between the DMS emission and BOD, COD, as well as TSS in the secondary treatment system.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/10434
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Master theses

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