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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/11136

Title: Adhesive Bonding of Concrete-steel Composite Bridges by Polyurethane Elastomer
Authors: Cheung, Billy Siu Fung
Advisor: Gauvreau, Douglas Paul
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: Composite Bridge
Adhesive Bonding
Polyurethane Elastomer
Raid Deck Replacement
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2008
Abstract: This thesis is motivated by the use of full-depth, precast, prestressed concrete panels to facilitate deck replacement of composite bridges. The shear pockets required in using convention shear stud connections, however, can cause durability problems. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of eliminating the use of shear studs, and adhesively bond the concrete and steel sections. The feasibility of the developed polyurethane adhesive joint is defined based on the serviceability and ultimate limit states. The joint must have sufficient stiffness that additional deflection due to slip must not be excessive. The adhesive and bond must also have sufficient strength to allow the development of the full plastic capacity of the composite section. The use of the developed adhesive joint in typical composite bridges was found to be feasible. The behaviour under live load was found to be close to a fully composite section.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/11136
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Civil Engineering - Master theses

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