test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/11150

Title: Uncoupling Protein-2 Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Cell Viability in the Pancreatic Beta Cell
Authors: Lee, Simon
Advisor: Wheeler, Michael
Department: Physiology
Keywords: uncoupling protein-2
diabetes
beta cell
reactive oxygen species
oxidative stress
cell viability
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2008
Abstract: Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) may be linked to the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but it is unclear whether this phenomenon pertains to the pancreatic beta cell. In this study, a UCP2-deficient mouse model was used to assess the importance of UCP2 to beta cell viability. We investigated the effect of UCP2 absence in response to a beta cell cytotoxic model of diabetes induction. In vivo treatment by the cytotoxic agent streptozotocin led to overall beta cell loss, but severity was not exacerbated by UCP2 deficiency. We also examined ROS production and cell viability in islet cells exposed to various stressors associated with oxidative stress. In vitro measurements of ROS and cell death in islet cells demonstrated that the response was not influenced by UCP2 expression. In contrast with UCP2 overexpression studies showing cytoprotection, this study reveals that beta cell survival is not compromised by the absence of UCP2.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/11150
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Lee_Simon_C_200806_MSc_thesis.pdf829.19 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft