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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/11171

Title: Characterizing a Role for Dopamine on Sleep and Cataplexy in Narcoleptic Mice
Authors: Tse, Gavin
Advisor: Peever, John H.
Yeomans, John S.
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: Narcolepsy
Dopamine
Sleep
Cataplexy
Mice
Amphetamine
Quinpirole
Sleep Attacks
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2008
Abstract: Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder that is characterized by persistent sleepiness, and cataplexy – an involuntary loss of waking muscle tone. Cataplexy and narcolepsy are caused by the loss of hypocretin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. However, it is hypothesized that dopamine is also involved in sleep and motor control and plays a role in cataplexy. This study investigated how manipulating dopamine affected sleep and cataplexy in narcoleptic mice devoid of hypocretin. We used d-amphetamine to increase endogenous dopamine levels and quinpirole (D2 agonist) to agonize D2 receptor sites. Amphetamine promoted wakefulness while decreasing sleep in wild-type mice, but was less effective in narcoleptic mice. Amphetamine also reduced cataplexy as well as sleep attacks (an indicator of sleepiness) in narcoleptic mice. Quinpirole had no effect on sleep or wakefulness; however, it potently increased cataplexy without affecting sleep attacks in narcoleptic mice.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/11171
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Cell and Systems Biology - Master theses

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