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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Journal of Medical Internet Research >
Volume 9 (2007) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16642


Title: Stakeholder Perspectives on the Development of a Virtual Clinic for Diabetes Care: Qualitative Study
Authors: Armstrong, Natalie
Hearnshaw, Hilary
Powell, John
Dale, Jeremy
Keywords: Original Paper
Virtual clinic
diabetes
Internet
stakeholder consultation
consumer health informatics
focus groups
Issue Date: 9-Aug-2007
Publisher: Gunther Eysenbach; Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Toronto, Canada
Citation: Natalie Armstrong, Hilary Hearnshaw, John Powell, Jeremy Dale. Stakeholder Perspectives on the Development of a Virtual Clinic for Diabetes Care: Qualitative Study. J Med Internet Res 2007;9(3):e23 <URL: http://www.jmir.org/2007/3/e23/>
Abstract: [This item is a preserved copy and is not necessarily the most recent version. To view the current item, visit http://www.jmir.org/2007/3/e23/ ] Background: The development of the Internet has created new opportunities for health care provision, including its use as a tool to aid the self-management of chronic conditions. We studied stakeholder reactions to an Internet-based “virtual clinic,” which would allow people with diabetes to communicate with their health care providers, find information about their condition, and share information and support with other users. Objective: The aim of the study was to present the results of a detailed consultation with a variety of stakeholder groups in order to identify what they regard as the desirable, important, and feasible characteristics of an Internet-based intervention to aid diabetes self-management. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with 12 people with type 1 diabetes who used insulin pumps. Participants were recruited through a local diabetes clinic. One-on-one interviews were conducted with 5 health care professionals from the same clinic (2 doctors, 2 nurses, 1 dietitian) and with 1 representative of an insulin pump company. We gathered patient consensus via email on the important and useful features of Internet-based systems used for other chronic conditions (asthma, epilepsy, myalgic encephalopathy, mental health problems). A workshop to gather expert consensus on the use of information technology to improve the care of young people with diabetes was organized. Results: Stakeholder groups identified the following important characteristics of an Internet-based virtual clinic: being grounded on personal needs rather than only providing general information; having the facility to communicate with, and learn from, peers; providing information on the latest developments and news in diabetes; being quick and easy to use. This paper discusses these characteristics in light of a review of the relevant literature. The development of a virtual clinic for diabetes that embodies these principles, and that is based on self-efficacy theory, is described. Conclusions: Involvement of stakeholders is vital early in the development of a complex intervention. Stakeholders have clear and relevant views on what a virtual clinic system should provide, and these views can be captured and synthesized with relative ease. This work has led to the design of a system that is able to meet user needs and is currently being evaluated in a pilot study.
Description: Reviewer: Nazi, Kim
Reviewer: Car, Josip
URI: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.2196/jmir.9.3.e23
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16642
ISSN: 1438-8871
Rights: © Natalie Armstrong, Hilary Hearnshaw, John Powell, Jeremy Dale. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org, 09.08.2007). Except where otherwise noted, articles published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, including full bibliographic details and the URL (see "please cite as" above), and this statement is included.
Appears in Collections:Volume 9 (2007)

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