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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Journal of Medical Internet Research >
Volume 9 (2007) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16643


Title: Use of the Internet to Communicate with Health Care Providers in the United States: Estimates from the 2003 and 2005 Health Information National Trends Surveys (HINTS)
Authors: Beckjord, Ellen Burke
Finney Rutten, Lila J
Squiers, Linda
Arora, Neeraj K
Volckmann, Lindsey
Moser, Richard P
Hesse, Bradford W
Keywords: Original Paper
Internet
patient-provider communication
electronic mail
information services, trends and utilization
medical informatics, trends
health education
health services
demography
data collection
health care surveys
neoplasms
regression analysis
Issue Date: 12-Jul-2007
Publisher: Gunther Eysenbach; Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Toronto, Canada
Citation: Ellen Burke Beckjord, Lila J Finney Rutten, Linda Squiers, Neeraj K Arora, Lindsey Volckmann, Richard P Moser, Bradford W Hesse. Use of the Internet to Communicate with Health Care Providers in the United States: Estimates from the 2003 and 2005 Health Information National Trends Surveys (HINTS). J Med Internet Res 2007;9(3):e20 <URL: http://www.jmir.org/2007/3/e20/>
Abstract: [This item is a preserved copy and is not necessarily the most recent version. To view the current item, visit http://www.jmir.org/2007/3/e20/ ] Background: Despite substantial evidence that the public wants access to Internet-based communication with health care providers, online patient-provider communication remains relatively uncommon, and few studies have examined sociodemographic and health-related factors associated with the use of online communication with health care providers at a population level. Objective: The aim of the study was to use nationally representative data to report on the prevalence of and changes in use of online patient-provider communication in 2003 and 2005 and to describe sociodemographic and health-related factors associated with its use. Methods: Data for this study are from two iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS 2003, HINTS 2005). In both years, respondents were asked whether they had ever used email or the Internet to communicate with a doctor or a doctor’s office. Adult Internet users in 2003 (n = 3982) and 2005 (n = 3244) were included in the present study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors for electronic communication with health care providers. Results: In 2003, 7% of Internet users had communicated online with an health care provider; this prevalence significantly increased to 10% in 2005. In multivariate analyses, Internet users with more years of education, who lived in a metro area, who reported poorer health status or who had a personal history of cancer were more likely to have used online patient-provider communication. Conclusions: Despite wide diffusion of the Internet, online patient-provider communication remains uncommon but is slowly increasing. Policy-level changes are needed to maximize the availability and effectiveness of online patient-provider communication for health care consumers and health care providers. Internet access remains a significant barrier to online patient-provider communication.
Description: Reviewer: Nelson, David
Reviewer: Bansil, Pooja
URI: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.2196/jmir.9.3.e20
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16643
ISSN: 1438-8871
Rights: © Ellen Burke Beckjord, Lila J Finney Rutten, Linda Squiers, Neeraj K Arora, Lindsey Volckmann, Richard P Moser, Bradford W Hesse. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org, 12.07.2007). Except where otherwise noted, articles published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, including full bibliographic details and the URL (see "please cite as" above), and this statement is included.
Appears in Collections:Volume 9 (2007)

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