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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Journal of Medical Internet Research >
Volume 10 (2008)  >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16658


Title: Reliability of Internet- Versus Telephone-Administered Questionnaires in a Diverse Sample of Smokers
Authors: Graham, Amanda L
Papandonatos, George D
Keywords: Original Paper
Reliability
smoking
Internet
diversity
measurement
psychometrics
minority groups
questionnaires
socioeconomic factors
social class
poverty
African Americans
Hispanic Americans
Issue Date: 26-Mar-2008
Publisher: Gunther Eysenbach; Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Toronto, Canada
Citation: Amanda L Graham, George D Papandonatos. Reliability of Internet- Versus Telephone-Administered Questionnaires in a Diverse Sample of Smokers. J Med Internet Res 2008;10(1):e8 <URL: http://www.jmir.org/2008/1/e8/>
Abstract: [This item is a preserved copy and is not necessarily the most recent version. To view the current item, visit http://www.jmir.org/2008/1/e8/ ] Background: Smoking is more prevalent among lower-income individuals and certain racial/ethnic minorities. Addressing tobacco cessation among diverse populations is an urgent public health priority. As Internet use continues to rise among all segments of the US population, Web-based interventions have enormous potential to reach priority populations. Conducting Web-based smoking cessation research in priority populations requires psychometrically sound measurement instruments. To date, only one published study has examined the psychometric properties of Internet-administered measures commonly used in Web-based cessation trials. However, the sample was homogeneous with regard to race/ethnicity and income. We sought to replicate and extend these findings in a more diverse sample of smokers. Objective: The aim was to examine the internal consistency and test-retest reliability of measures commonly used in smoking cessation clinical trials among racial/ethnic minorities and smokers with lower income. Methods: Participants were enrolled in a randomized trial of the efficacy of an Internet smoking cessation program between June 2005 and September 2006. Following a baseline telephone assessment and randomization into the parent trial, participants were recruited to the reliability substudy. In phase I of recruitment, all participants in the parent trial were recruited to the substudy; in phase II, all consecutive racial/ethnic minority participants in the parent trial were recruited. Race and ethnicity were assessed via self-report using two standard items from the US Office of Management and Budget. An email was sent 2 days after the telephone assessment with a link to the Internet survey. Measures examined were quit methods, perceived stress, depression, social support, smoking temptations, alcohol use, perceived health status, and income. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of Internet- versus telephone-administered measures were examined within four strata defined by race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic White, racial/ethnic minority) and annual household income (US $40,000 or less, more than $40,000). Results: Of the 442 individuals invited, 319 participated (72% response rate): 52.4% were non-Hispanic White, 22.9% Black, 11.6% Hispanic, 7.8% Asian, 4.4% American Indian / Alaska Native, and 1% Native Hawaiian / Other Pacific Islander. About half (49.4%) reported an annual household income of US $40,000 or less, and 25.7% had a high school degree or less. Test-retest reliability was satisfactory to excellent across all strata for the majority of measures examined: 9 of 12 continuous variables had intraclass correlation coefficients ≥ 0.70, and 10 of 18 binary variables and both ordinal variables had kappa coefficients ≥ 0.70. Test-retest reliability of several quit methods varied across strata. Conclusions: Race/ethnicity and income do not affect the psychometric properties of most Internet-administered measures examined. This knowledge adds to the confidence of conducting Web-based smoking cessation research and strengthens the scientific rigor of collecting information via the Internet on racial/ethnic minority and low-income subgroups. Trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov NCT00282009 (parent trial)
Description: Reviewer: Etter, Jean Francois
Reviewer: Palepu, Anita
URI: http://dx.doi.org/ 10.2196/jmir.987
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16658
ISSN: 1438-8871
Rights: © Amanda L Graham, George D Papandonatos. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 26.03.2008. Except where otherwise noted, articles published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided 1) the original work is properly cited, including full bibliographic details and the original article URL on www.jmir.org, and 2) this statement is included.
Appears in Collections:Volume 10 (2008)

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