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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16686

Title: Bringing it Home: Women's Health Work
Authors: Armstrong, Pat
Armstrong, Hugh
Keywords: WOMEN’S HEALTH, CARE GIVING, HEALTH WORK,
WOMEN’S LABOUR, PUBLIC/PRIVATE
Issue Date: Dec-2008
Publisher: Pristine Publications
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life, Vol 7 (2), pg. 6-15
Abstract: The current paper addresses the past and present issues in Canadian health care, paying particular attention to the gendered implications of that care. Starting from an analysis of the theories and practices of health care in 1960s and 1970s, the paper summarizes the debates in the division of labour, women’s changing role in the paid labour market/their segregated work and the unfolding interest in violence in the household. In the second section, in addition to the continuing debates, the critique of what the second wave feminist movement has missed is identified. Most particularly, the debates about the diversity amongst women themselves as representing different classes, races and abilities and how their role as receivers and providers of care is configured by their various locations and relations are highlighted. The beginning of the 2000s has brought some new issues such as increased privatization of health care as well as insecurities and precariousness of paid work. Moreover, there remains the continuation of older issues such as gendered inequities in non-paid work, violence and increasing disparities amongst women themselves. Looking for the future, the authors suggest the need for an ‘active state’ which is democratic, responsive, equity seeking and service providing, as well as one that assures meaningful employment. Otherwise, the cost of care will be unbearable in social/economic terms, as well as in relational terms for women who deliver/are expected to deliver a major chunk of health work.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/16686
Appears in Collections:Sociology

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