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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17180

Title: Designing a Matrix Metalloproteinase-7-activated Quantum Dot Nanobeacon for Cancer Detection Imaging
Authors: Hung, Hsiang-Hua Andy
Advisor: Chan, Warren C. W.
Zheng, Gang
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: Quantum dot
Matrix metalloproteinase
Cancer detection
Optical imaging
Protease sensor
Nanotechnology
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: Quantum Dot (QD) nanobeacons distinguish themselves from molecular beacons with the promise of non-linear activation, tunability, and multi-functionality. These unique features make them highly attractive for cancer detection imaging with opportunities for increased signal-to-background ratio and tunable sensitivity. In this thesis, a nanobeacon was designed to target matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), known to be over-expressed by a wide array of tumours. The nanobeacon is normally dark until specifically activated by MMP-7. The overall design strategy links single QDs to multiple energy acceptors by GPLGLARK peptides that can be cleaved specifically by MMP-7. However, design details such as the choice of energy acceptor and conjugation method was found to drastically alter the function of the nanobeacon. Studies of nanobeacons synthesized with Black Hole Quencher-1 or Rhodamine Red by either covalent conjugation or electrostatic self-assembly revealed that peptide conformation and bonding flexibility are both important considerations in nanobeacon design due to QD sterics.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17180
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering - Master theses

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