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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17185

Title: Antisaccades: A Probe into the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Alzheimer's Disease
Authors: Kaufman-Simpkins, Liam
Advisor: Black, Sandra
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: Antisaccades
Alzheimer's Disease
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: The number of people living with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is projected to increase dramatically over the next few decades, making the search for treatments and tools to measure the progression of AD increasingly urgent. The antisaccade task, a hands- and language-free metric, may provide a functional index of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC), which is damaged in the later stages of AD. Patients with AD make significantly more antisaccade errors than controls, however, performance in mild AD has remained unexplored. We hypothesized that mild patients will make more errors than controls. Thirty AD patients and 31 age-match controls completed both laptop-based and clinical versions of the antisaccade task. Two thirds of patients with AD made significantly more errors and corrected less of their errors than age-matched controls. Our findings indicate that antisaccade impairments exist in mild AD, suggesting DLPFC pathology may be present earlier than suggested by previous studies.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17185
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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