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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17191

Title: Analysis of Naked in the Canonical Wnt Pathway
Authors: Lau, Garnet Jean
Advisor: Attisano, Liliana
Department: Biochemistry
Keywords: Naked
Wnt
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: Wnt signalling is involved throughout development and is inappropriately activated in a variety of human cancers. In the canonical pathway, secreted Wnt proteins induce the stabilization of b-catenin. Drosophila Naked (Nkd), or Nkd1 and Nkd2 in vertebrates, is believed to antagonize canonical Wnt signalling through an interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl). Analysis of a high-throughput protein-protein interaction screen conducted in our lab led to the identification of novel Nkd1 interacting proteins, including Nkd1/2 and Axin1. Mapping of Nkd1 regions required for these novel interactions and functional studies, including transcriptional and siRNA mediated knockdown assays, were performed to examine the role of Nkd1 in canonical Wnt signalling. Previous work suggests that Nkd1 functions only through Dvl, but this work suggests that Nkd1 acts via a more complex mechanism. In addition to serving as an antagonist to regulate the canonical Wnt pathway, we propose that Nkd1 may also act positively to promote signalling.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17191
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Biochemistry - Master theses

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