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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17197

Title: Evaluating Alternate Anthropometric Measures as Predictors of Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). The Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS)
Authors: MacKay, Meredith
Advisor: Hanley, Anthony James Gordon
Department: Nutritional Sciences
Keywords: Type 2 diabetes mellitus
Obesity
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: The goal of this study was to compare different anthropometric measures in terms of their ability to predict T2DM and to determine whether predictive ability was modified by ethnicity. Anthropometrics were measured at baseline on 1073 non-Hispanic Whites (nHW), African Americans (AA) and Hispanics (HA), of which 146 developed T2DM after 5.2 years. Logistic regression models were used with areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AROC) comparing the prediction of models. Overall, there was no clear distinction between measures of overall and central obesity in terms of T2DM prediction. Waist-height ratio (AROC=0.678) was the most predictive measure, followed by BMI (AROC=0.674). Results were similar in nHW and HA, although, in AA, central adiposity measures best predicted T2DM. Measures of central and overall adiposity predicted T2DM to a similar degree, except in AA where central measures were most predictive.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17197
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Nutritional Sciences - Master theses

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