test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17198

Title: Aglycone Modulation of HIV Gp120 Binding to Glycosphingolipid (GSL) Detergent-resistant Membrane (DRM) Constructs
Authors: Manis, Adam
Advisor: Lingwood, Clifford A.
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Keywords: HIV, Gp120, Glycosphingolipids, Lipid Rafts
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: HIV gp120 binds CD4+ cells within plasma membrane lipid rafts inducing a conformational change in gp120 that exposes its V3 loop that binds to a chemokine co-receptor, also within lipid rafts, and initiates fusion. Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) may also be bound by gp120. Lipid rafts, enriched with GSLs and cholesterol, are required for HIV entry and therefore the binding of gp120 to GSL-containing vesicles has been studied. Most of the GSL-structures were within the theoretical raft fraction on a discontinuous sucrose gradient while gp120 binding occurred outside of this fraction where a minority of structures migrated. Gb3 fatty acid content modulated binding. Gp120 bound preferentially to structures depleted of cholesterol and binding was enhanced by treating gp120 with CD4. Two water-soluble mimics of Gb3 inhibited gp120 binding to the different structures. The results demonstrate that the aglycone modulation of GSLs alters their receptor function and that the soluble mimics inhibit binding.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17198
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Manis_Adam_K_200811_Master_thesis.pdf12.81 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft