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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17200

Title: The Heterogeneous Oxidation of n-Hexane Soot by Ozone: Initial Uptake Coefficient, Mechanism, and the Effect of Surface Coatings
Authors: McCabe, Jeffrey Joseph
Advisor: Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.
Department: Chemistry
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: The heterogeneous oxidation of n-hexane soot surfaces by gas-phase ozone has been studied in a coated-wall flow tube connected to a mass spectrometer. Uptake measurements confirm earlier studies that the initial uptake is primarily non-catalytic and that the number of reactive surface sites is close to that of a full monolayer. The initial uptake kinetics exhibit an inverse dependence on ozone gas-phase concentration, as expected if the reaction proceeds via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. Support for this reaction not being an Eley-Rideal process comes from the lack of temperature dependence of the initial uptake coefficient, and that a saturated surface coverage of adsorbed dodecane does not affect the kinetics. It is demonstrated that there is a strong similarity between the initial uptake kinetics for ozone loss on a wide variety of surfaces. This suggests that the reactions proceed through a common rate determining step, most likely involving adsorbed ozone molecules.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17200
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemistry - Master theses

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