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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17202

Title: The Drivers and Performance of Corporate Environmental and Social Responsibility in the Canadian Mining Industry
Authors: McKinley, Andrew
Advisor: Desrochers, Pierre
Department: Geography
Keywords: CSR
Environment
Mining
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a movement which seeks profitable solutions to environmental and social problems facing corporations and society. In this document firm level drivers of CSR adoption are examined to develop a business case for social/environmental factor integration, built on the link between each driver and profitability. A review of CSR is followed by an examination of a set of short case studies involving the Canadian mining industry and an analysis of the environmental/social efforts of mining organizations, focusing on the industry’s environmental performance and its relationship with aboriginal peoples. It is argued that a positive link exists between firm level profitability and environmental/social performance in the Canadian mining industry. As a result, mining firms have undertaken initiatives which have led to improved environmental and social performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17202
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Geography - Master theses

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