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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17203

Title: Behaviour and Design of Extradosed Bridges
Authors: Mermigas, Konstantinos Kris
Advisor: Gauvreau, Douglas Paul
Department: Civil Engineering
Keywords: extradosed prestressing
bridge design
cable pretensioning
cable-stayed
cantilever construction
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2009
Abstract: The purpose of this thesis is to provide insight into how different geometric parameters such as tower height, girder depth, and pier dimensions influence the structural behaviour, cost, and feasibility of an extradosed bridge. A study of 51 extradosed bridges shows the variability in proportions and use of extradosed bridges, and compares their material quantities and structural characteristics to girder and cable-stayed bridges. The strategies and factors that must be considered in the design of an extradosed bridge are discussed. Two cantilever constructed girder bridges, an extradosed bridge with stiff girder, and an extradosed bridge with stiff tower are designed for a three span bridge with central span of 140 m. The structural behaviour, materials utilisation, and costs of each bridge are compared. Providing stiffness either in the girder or in the piers of an extradosed bridge are both found to be effective stategies that lead to competitive designs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17203
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Civil Engineering - Master theses

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