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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17218

Title: Neuropsychological Contributions to Symptomatology in Eating Disordered Patients
Authors: Romero, Kristoffer
Advisor: Nussbaum, David
Department: Psychology
Keywords: eating disorders
neuropsychology
set-shifting
decision-making
Issue Date: 26-Feb-2009
Abstract: The present study examined the claim that neuropsychological deficits in set-shifting and emotional decision making are present in eating disordered patients, and to what extent these deficits relate to specific aspects of disordered eating. Sixteen eating disordered patients and 38 controls were given a battery of neuropsychological measures, as well as questionnaires measuring disordered eating. Compared to controls, patients demonstrated poorer performance on tasks of set-shifting, but not decision making, psychomotor speed, working memory, or IQ. Across groups, poor set-shifting was correlated with food-, shape-, and weight concerns, and restricting, whereas poor decision making was correlated to restricting. The study demonstrates that set-shifting deficits are present in eating disordered patients, and that specific relations exist between cognitive performance in different domains and disordered eating.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17218
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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