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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17219

Title: Adaptive Processing in High Frequency Surface Wave Radar
Authors: Saleh, Oliver S.
Advisor: Adve, Raviraj
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Keywords: Adaptive Processing
Radar
HFSWR
Low Complexity
Multistage
Issue Date: 26-Feb-2009
Abstract: High-Frequency Surface Wave Radar (HFSWR) is a radar technology that offers numerous advantages for surveillance of coastal waters beyond the exclusive economic zone. However, target detection and tracking is primarily limited by ionospheric interference. Ionospheric clutter is characterized by a high degree of nonhomogeneity and nonstationarity, which makes its suppression difficult using conventional processing techniques. Space-time adaptive processing techniques have enjoyed great success in airborne radar, but have not yet been investigated in the context of HFSWR. This thesis is primarily concerned with the evaluation of existing STAP techniques in the HFSWR scenario and the development of a new multistage adaptive processing approach, dubbed the Fast Fully Adaptive (FFA) scheme, which was developed with the particular constraints of the HFSWR interference environment in mind. Three different spatio-temporal partitioning schemes are introduced and a thorough investigation of the performance of the FFA is conducted.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17219
Appears in Collections:Master
The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering - Master theses

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