test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17222

Title: Structural and Functional Insights on Regulation by Phenolic Compounds
Authors: Shahinas, Dea
Advisor: Christendat, Dinesh
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: aromatic amino acid synthesis
metabolic regulation
Issue Date: 26-Feb-2009
Abstract: The shikimate pathway is a primary metabolic pathway involved in the synthesis of aromatic compounds in plants, fungi, apicomplexan parasites and microbes. The absence of this pathway in animals makes it ideal for the synthesis of antimicrobial compounds and herbicides. Additionally, its branching into indole hormone synthesis and phenylpropanoid secondary metabolism makes this pathway attractive for metabolic engineering. Here, the focus is on the first step of the shikimate pathway catalyzed by DAHP synthase. This step consists of the condensation of phosphoenol pyruvate and erythrose-4-phosphate to make DAHP, which undergoes another six catalytic steps to synthesize chorismate, the precursor of the aromatic amino acids. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three DAHP synthase isozymes, which are known to indirectly regulate downstream pathways in response to wounding and pathogen stress. The model presented here proposes that DAHP synthase isozymes are regulated by the end products tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17222
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Cell and Systems Biology - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Shahinas_Dea_200811_MSc_thesis.pdf2.99 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft