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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17225

Title: Building High Performing Globally Dispersed Teams: Challenging Inequality to Establish Trust
Authors: Stephens-Wegner, Cristin Anne
Advisor: Laiken, Marilyn
Jackson, Nancy
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: global workplace
Organization Development
team development
team facilitation
equity
inequality
diversity
diversity management
Postcolonial Theory
autoethnography
storytelling
personal stories
globally dispersed teams
high performing teams
trust
conflict
social justice
virtual
power
difference
identity
Issue Date: 26-Feb-2009
Abstract: This thesis explores barriers to the establishment of trust needed for high performing teams due to inequality in the context of a global economy. Postcolonial Theory is introduced to illustrate how inequality is a key aspect of diversity in the current context of the global workplace. Different philosophies underlying the values and norms in organizations are examined to make sense of contemporary approaches to diversity management in terms of how power, difference, and identity are addressed. This provides an understanding of the context of current team development praxis in working with diversity. Using autoethnography, the author tells personal stories of working in diverse teams to convey the complex ways in which power, difference, and identity coalesce in real-life experience. Some theoretical foundations are developed for facilitating the building of team trust in contexts with different philosophical approaches to diversity. Addressing social justice in Organization Development work is considered.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17225
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology - Master theses

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