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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17381

Title: Female and Male Suicides in Batman, Turkey: Poverty, Social Change, Patriarchal Oppression and Gender Links
Authors: Bagli, Mazhar
Sev'er, Aysan
Issue Date: May-2003
Publisher: Pristine Publications
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life, Vol 2 (1), pg. 60-84
Abstract: Traditional sociological theories have overlooked the different reasons why men and women commit suicide. In this paper, we first discuss and then challenge traditional theories, paying close attention to Batman, Turkey where suicide rate for women is much higher than for men. Based on interviews with the guardians of 31 suicide victims, we attempt to reconstruct the disheartening living conditions of the victims. The disheartening conditions in Batman are due to geographic isolation, terrorist/ultra-religious activities and an unprecedented migration to city centers. The outcomes are unemployment, poverty, demise of education and healthcare systems and congested, substandard housing arrangements. Yet, the presence of such anomic conditions have not alarmingly raised the suicide rates of Batman men. We suggest that extreme patriarchal oppression of Batman women may be responsible for their high suicide rate. Our observations lead us to believe that prevention of female suicides may require the loosening of the patriarchal choke on women in general and young women in particular.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17381
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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