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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17425

Title: DNA Palindrome Revision in Mammalian Cells
Authors: Belsito, Tara Anne
Advisor: Lewis, Susanna
Department: Molecular and Medical Genetics
Keywords: DNA Repair
Palindrome
Issue Date: 14-Jul-2009
Abstract: A DNA palindrome is a sequence of DNA followed by an exact inverted copy of itself. Palindromes are associated with gross chromosomal instability in mammalian cells. This may be related to their ability to extrude a double-stranded cruciform structure. In mammalian cells, palindromes have been shown to undergo centre-directed rearrangements resulting in a central region of asymmetry. This process occurs via a mechanism termed â centre break palindrome revisionâ . In this thesis, I have investigated palindrome revision in mammalian cells using two existing assays. In the first, performed by transfection of an extrachromosomal palindromic dimer, I have shown that joining of palindrome-mediated double-strand breaks does not depend solely on NHEJ and instead relies heavily on an alternate end-joining pathway. Using the second assay, the Line78 mouse model which contains a 15.4kb transgenic palindrome, I have shown that small modifications near the centre of the palindrome prevent these centre-directed rearrangements possibly by inhibiting cruciform formation.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17425
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Molecular Genetics - Master theses

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