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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17427

Title: The Isolation and Identification of the Definitive Adult Neural Stem Cell Following Ablation of the Neurogenic GFAP Expressing Subependymal Cell
Authors: Doherty, James Patrick
Advisor: Morshead, Cindi M.
Department: Medical Science
Keywords: Adult neural stem cells
Neuroscience
Neural stem cells
Issue Date: 14-Jul-2009
Abstract: Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult forebrain are thought to comprise a subpopulation of cells that express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), termed B cells. These GFAP+ cells generate proliferating neuroblasts that migrate from the lateral ventricle subependyma along the rostral migratory stream to become olfactory bulb interneurons. Based on this lineage, we set out to create a NSC deficient mouse through targeted ablation of dividing GFAP+ cells in vivo. We successfully depleted the GFAP+ cells as seen using an in vitro colony forming assay in multiple kill paradigms, however we were unable to permanently eliminate the multipotent, self-renewing colony forming cells. Instead, the targeted ablation of GFAP+ cells revealed an upstream, GFAP- cell that was induced to proliferate in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). These findings support the hypothesis that a population of GFAP-, LIF responsive cells are the definitive adult NSC upstream of GFAP+ cells.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17427
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Medical Science - Master theses

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