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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17434

Title: Novel Formulations of Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Drugs to Ameliorate Ischemic Damage Measured In Vitro
Authors: Liang, Philip
Advisor: Carlen, Peter Louis
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Neuroinflammation
Ischemia
Issue Date: 14-Jul-2009
Abstract: The two of major pathways that cause ischemic damage are oxidative stress and inflammation. To decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation, new anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agents are tested in ischemic models. In order to study ALRX828C anti-inflammatory properties, an in vivo six-day old air pouch model of inflammation was used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of ALRX828C. Also, the dose response of ALRX828C for TNFα (IC50 = 30 μM) and IL-17 (IC50 = 1.3 μM) were determined by using human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures stimulated with ionomycin and PMA. To examine ALRX828C anti-inflammatory effect in neuroinflammation, a neurodegenerative model was used to evaluate its potential. I also showed that reducing oxidative stress with a potent antioxidant, Idebenone in nano-emulsion form, can effectively reduce tissue damage during ischemia in organotypic slice culture subjected to oxygen-glucose depravation (OGD). In conclusion, reducing oxidative stress and inflammation after stroke can reduce ischemic damage substantially.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17434
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Physiology - Master theses

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