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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17435

Title: An Event-related Potential Investigation on Associative Encoding and the Effects of Intra-list Semantic Similarity
Authors: Kim, Alice Sun-Nam
Advisor: Picton, Terence W.
Tulving, Endel
Department: Psychology
Keywords: association formation
event-related potential
intra-list semantic similarity
P555
N425
late wave
Issue Date: 14-Jul-2009
Abstract: Event-related potentials were recorded as subjects were presented with pairs of words, one word at a time, to examine the electrocortical manifestations of association formation and the effect of intra-list semantic similarity. Two types of lists were presented: Same – all pairs belonged to the same semantic category; Different – all pairs belonged to a different semantic category. Subjects were told to memorize the pairs for a following paired associate recall test. Recall was better for the Different than Same lists. Subsequent recall was predicted by the amplitudes of a potential lasting throughout the epoch and the P555 to each word of a pair (likely reflecting state- and item-related encoding activity, respectively), as well as a late positive wave that occurred after the offset of the second word, which is thought to reflect association formation. A larger N425 was elicited by pairs in the Different than Same lists, likely reflecting semantic integration.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17435
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Psychology - Master theses

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