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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17437

Title: The Effects of Salvia hispanica L. (Salba) on Postprandial Glycemia and Subjective Appetite
Authors: Lee, Amy
Advisor: Vuksan, Vladimir
Department: Nutritional Sciences
Issue Date: 14-Jul-2009
Abstract: Dietary interventions have been attempted to lower the risk of obesity, diabetes and CVD by the reduction of postprandial hyperglycemia and prevention of excess caloric intake. Evidence suggests an independent predictive role of postprandial glycemia for CVD. Furthermore, due to the possible role of obesity in the development of CVD and T2D, research has focused on appetite suppression to reduce excessive food intake. Here we investigate the ability of the novel oil-rich grain Salvia hispanica L. (Salba) to lower postprandial glycemia and reduce appetite when added to a carbohydrate meal. In our first study, we investigated the effects of Salba in escalating doses on both parameters in healthy individuals. In our second study we compared the effectiveness of ground and whole forms of Salba on the same parameters. Results confirmed our hypotheses, as Salba given in either form positively affected postprandial glycemia and mildly suppressed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17437
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Nutritional Sciences - Master theses

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