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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17446

Title: Understanding the Factors that Influence Headwater Stream Flows in Response to Storm Events
Authors: Stanfield, Les
Advisor: Jackson, Donald Andrew
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Keywords: headwater
flows
streams
impacts
flashiness
rainfall
Ontario
discharge
Issue Date: 14-Jul-2009
Abstract: I studied how geology, land use and rainfall, correlated with peak flow responses in 110 headwater stream sites during a drought year. Highest discharges were observed in the most developed catchments and in the most poorly drained soils, but specific responses were variable depending on both geology and land disturbance. Redundancy analysis indicated that both surficial geology and land disturbance were important predictors of discharge and that rainfall was in general a poor predictor of discharge. I conclude that responses of headwater streams to individual storms are unpredictable from data generated using GIS, but increased peak flows occur associated with human development, mitigated by surficial geology. The headwater streams that are most vulnerable to flow alterations occur on poorly drained soils, and where urbanization tends to concentrate. Much greater attention to managing water is required if further degradation of stream ecosystems is to be prevented from our future land use.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17446
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology - Master theses

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