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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17489

Title: Is Depression Associated with Edentulism in Canadian Adults?
Authors: Al Shamrany, Muneera
Advisor: Lawrence, Herenia P.
Department: Dentistry
Keywords: edentulism
depression
older adults
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2009
Abstract: It has been hypothesized that depression can be both a risk factor and a consequence of oral diseases. Tooth loss leads to discomfort, pain, and functional limitations which could lead to disability and, subsequently, to handicap. However, the association between depression and edentulism has not been established yet. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Cycle 2.1 were used to examine the association between edentulism and depression in community-dwelling Canadians 45 years of age and older. Separate logistic regression models were developed for dentate and edentulous groups as well. Different regression selection methods were implemented and the area under the ROC curve was used to select models with the highest predictability. Analysis showed that edentulism was not associated with depression. For the edentulous group, oral/facial pain was the only oral health factor predicting depression, whereas avoiding smiling or laughing, dry mouth, oral/facial pain predicted depression in the dentate individuals.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17489
Appears in Collections:Master
Faculty of Dentistry - Master theses

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