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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17496

Title: Peptide Modification of Sodium Alginate To Induce Selective Capture of Cardiac Cell Populations
Authors: Brown, Melissa Andrea Natalie
Advisor: Radisic, Milica
Department: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Keywords: alginate
cardiac
RGDS
adhesion
VAPG
REDV
microfluidics
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2009
Abstract: Isolation of selected populations from heterogeneous cell mixtures and retrieval of the captured population of interest for regenerative medicine and diagnostics applications is one of the challenges that may be addressed by microfluidics. An affinity adhesion strategy was tested using the tetrapeptides RGDS (arg-gly-asp-ser), REDV (arg-glu-asp-val) and VAPG (val-ala-pro-gly) to modify an alginate hydrogel surface layer to selectively adhere fibroblast (FB), endothelial (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) populations, respectively, of the non-myocyte cardiac cell fraction. Incorporation of peptides into sodium alginate gel surface coatings demonstrated a preferential, seeding density-dependent adhesion relationship on alginate-RGDS when tested with a cardiomyocyte-depleted cell suspension in both static culture and in microfluidic devices. Seeding density-dependent attachment was seen with close to 100% release of viable cells from coated surfaces upon application of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Further work will optimize the system with REDV and VAPG to capture ECs and SMCs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17496
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Master theses

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