test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17498

Title: Towards a Microfluidics-based Nucleic Acid Biosensor Using Immobilized Quantum Dot – DNA Conjugates for FRET Detection of Target Oligonucleotides
Authors: Cauchi, Jonathan
Advisor: Krull, Ulrich Jorg
Department: Chemistry
Keywords: Analytical
Chemistry
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2009
Abstract: The potential for an electrokinetically driven, FRET-based microfluidic biosensor for SNP discrimination has been explored. The method functionalized the glass wall of a PDMS/glass microfluidics channel with multidentate thiol ligands to noncovalently immobilize MPA capped CdSe/ZnS QDs. Single stranded probe DNA could then be immobilized to QDs and target material could be delivered electrokinetically to the sensing surface. SNP discrimination could then occur by manipulation of shear, electrical and thermal effects derived from the applied voltage. The stability of immobilized QDs was investigated by EOF experiments that applied 500 V and 100 V voltages for 10 minutes to initiate electrokintetic flow. Fluorescence intensity measurements showed nearly complete removal of QDs from slides when compared with controls at both voltages. Pressure driven flow experiments demonstrated reduced dissociation of immobilized of QDs compared to channels exposed to EOF. A covalent approach is likely necessary to ensure stability of immobilized QDs during EOF.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17498
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Chemistry - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Cauchi_Jonathan_20096_MSc_Thesis.pdf2.09 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft