test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17499

Title: A Study of Soot Cake Formation in a Diesel Particulate Filter
Authors: Charbonneau, Paul
Advisor: Wallace, James S.
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: Diesel Emissions
Diesel Particulate Filter
Issue Date: 30-Jul-2009
Abstract: A methodology was developed to dissect diesel particulate filters to study the time effect of loading for two different fuels: ULSD and a biodiesel blend. Filters loaded with soot from a diesel engine for exposure times of 1, 2, 5 and 10 hours were fractured and samples of filter substrates were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Observations revealed the sharp rise in pressure drop to be attributable to the clogging of the pores in the channel wall, leading to the formation of a pore-bridge. Cross sectional imaging of wall sections revealed this pore-bridge to be shallow, with significant particulate depositions limited to the first quarter of the depth of the filter walls. Images revealed increasingly dense deposits and the formation of coarse particles and soot cakes. Raman spectroscopy revealed no significant graphitization of the soot cake. The dissection methodology exhibits significant potential for future studies on DPFs.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17499
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Charbonneau_Paul_2009_MASc_thesis.pdf19.03 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft