test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17509

Title: Role of Simulation in Rehabilitation: The Effectiveness of Model Hands When Learning to Make Othoses
Authors: Hagemann, Eric
Advisor: Carnahan, Heather
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: Simulation
Education
Rehabilitation
Orthoses
Motor learning
Issue Date: 10-Aug-2009
Abstract: Simulation has not been extensively studied for teaching rehabilitation practitioners technical skills. The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of an artificial hand as a teaching tool for orthosis-making. Thirty-four participants were randomized into three groups. The first group made five orthoses on a human hand, the second made five orthoses on a model hand, and the third made one orthosis on a human hand. A one-week transfer test consisted of all participants making one orthosis on a human hand. Their performance and orthoses were evaluated using a validated checklist and global rating scale. No differences were found between groups for process-related measures. The model hand group did better on final product measures and had a larger movement time than the other two groups. Practicing on artificial hands is a useful way of learning to make orthoses. Additionally, higher practice volume did not lead to better performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17509
Appears in Collections:Master
Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Hagemann_Eric_N_200906_MSc_Thesis.pdf1.4 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft