test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17511

Title: Soluble Globotriaosylceramide as a Potential Systemic and Local Inhibitor of HIV Infection
Authors: Harrison, Amanda L.
Advisor: Branch, Donald R.
Lingwood, Clifford A.
Department: Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology
Issue Date: 10-Aug-2009
Abstract: Previously we have identified the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3/Pk) as an inhibitor and resistance factor against HIV-1 infection in vitro. Here we show that a novel, soluble, completely synthetic Gb3 analogue, FSLGb3, inhibits infection of X4 strains of HIV-1 in the Jurkat T-cell line and both R5 and X4 strains in PBMCs. FSLGb3 absorbs into cellular plasma membranes and membrane adsorbed FSLGb3 was able to inhibit subsequent HIV-1 infection. We have also developed a mouse model to test in vivo the efficacy of soluble Gb3 analogs in the prevention of mucosal viral infection. Soluble Gb3 was incorporated into gel or alone and applied directly to the vaginal and rectal mucosal tissue of mice. We have not yet shown a statistically significant reduction in infection, although a trend towards inhibition is evident. Our studies show synthetic Gb3 to be an inhibitor of HIV-1 infection and further exploration of therapeutic strategies are warranted.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17511
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Harrison_Amanda_L_200906_MSc_thesis.pdfEntire thesis3.14 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft