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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17516

Title: Characterization of Friable1-like Homologues in Arabidopsis using Bioinformatics and Reverse Genetics
Authors: Hsieh, Chih-Cheng Sherry
Advisor: Provart, Nicholas
Department: Cell and Systems Biology
Keywords: FRIABLE1
Pectin
Glycosyltransferase
Pollen
Cell adhesion
Issue Date: 10-Aug-2009
Abstract: The FRIABLE1 (FRB1) gene is identified to be a novel glycosyltransferase involved in cell adhesion, based on reverse genetics and immunocytochemistry studies. A total of 31 FRB1 paralogues were found in Arabidopsis thaliana using a bioinformatics approach. The following expression analysis has revealed 6 FRB1 paralogues to be pollen-specific. One pollen-specific FRB1 paralogue, At1g14970, exhibits longer silique lengths when exposed to higher than normal temperature at 28oC in its T-DNA insertional knockout when compared to Columbia wildtype plants. This may be due to the loss of temperature sensing and the continuous stimulated pollen tube cell wall growth or the up-regulation of genes that encode other glycosyltransferases. Thus, the identification of FRB1 paralogues and homologues in both rice and poplar may have tremendous potential to increase their yield in global warming for agricultural and industrial benefits.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17516
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Cell and Systems Biology - Master theses

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