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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17519

Title: Uric Acid as a Growth Factor for Activated B Cells
Authors: Khaja, Hajera
Advisor: Spaner, David
Department: Medical Biophysics
Keywords: Immunology
Cell and molecular biology
Issue Date: 10-Aug-2009
Abstract: Cancer vaccines targeted against tumour cells seek to mimic immune responses against viral infections. Given the unique properties of B cells that allow them to present antigens proficiently, activated B cells can be used in a vaccine setting to launch effective anti-tumour T cell responses. Activation induced cell death, however, presents a major hurdle in the generation of large numbers of B cells. Since apoptosis is mediated by oxidative stress, uric acid was used as an antioxidant, enabling increased growth of normal B cells. Further investigation in TK6 cells revealed that uric acid was mediating its effects extracellularly and initiating signaling pathways that culminated in the activation of ERK and JNK proteins and production of IL10, which was necessary, but not sufficient, in mediating the growth effects of uric acid. The results outlined in this study implicate uric acid as a novel growth factor for activated B cells.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17519
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Medical Biophysics - Master theses

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