test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute >
Toronto Rehab Publications >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17581

Title: Improvements in tongue strength and pressure-generation precision following a tongue-pressure training protocol in older individuals with dysphagia: Three case reports
Authors: Yeates, Erin M
Molfenter, Sonja M
Steele, Catriona M
Keywords: speech-language pathology
dysphagia
rehabilitation
aging
strength
accuracy
Issue Date: Sep-2008
Publisher: Dovepress
Citation: Yeates, EM, Molfenter, SM, Steele, CM (2008) Improvements in tongue strength and pressure-generation precision following a tongue-pressure training protocol in older individuals with dysphagia: three case reports. Clin Interv Aging, 3(4): 735-47 Original Article available at http://www.dovepress.com
Abstract: Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, often occurs secondary to conditions such as stroke, head injury or progressive disease, many of which increase in frequency with advancing age. Sarcopenia, the gradual loss of muscle bulk and strength, can place older individuals at greater risk for dysphagia. Data are reported for three older participants in a pilot trial of a tongue-pressure training therapy. During the experimental therapy protocol, participants performed isometric strength exercises for the tongue as well as tongue pressure accuracy tasks. Biofeedback was provided using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI), an instrument that measures tongue pressure. Treatment outcome measures show increased isometric tongue strength, improved tongue pressure generation accuracy, improved bolus control on videofluoroscopy, and improved functional dietary intake by mouth. These preliminary results indicate that, for these three adults with dysphagia, tongue-pressure training was beneficial for improving both instrumental and functional aspects of swallowing. The experimental treatment protocol holds promise as a rehabilitative tool for various dysphagia populations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17581
Appears in Collections:Toronto Rehab Publications

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Yeates_Molfenter_Steele_CIA_2008.pdf165.14 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft