test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering >
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering >
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17588

Title: Flow Downstream of a Cluster of Nine Jets
Authors: Boutazakhti, Mohamed
Sullivan, Pierre E
Thomson, Murray J
Yimer, Ibrahim
Keywords: Combustion
Mixing
Issue Date: May-2007
Publisher: ASME
Citation: Journal of Fluids Engineering MAY 2007, Vol. 129 Pg 541
Abstract: This work is an experimental investigation of the flow downstream of a low emission nozzle. The nozzle is a 3 3 square matrix of nine small swirling air jets, has a design swirl number of 0.8, and operates at a Reynolds number of 40,000. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to map the velocity field under nonburning and atmospheric conditions for the first 18 jet diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Seeding was liquid injected into the air stream and drops were sized to filter out those larger than 3 3 pixels. The results showed that the cluster blends into a single jet-like flow 12 jet diameters downstream with the axial component of the velocity displaying self-similar properties. Lateral jet interaction slows the decay of the axial component of the velocity and jet expansion in the developed region while accelerating the decay of the radial component.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17588
Appears in Collections:Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Flow Downstream of a Cluster of nine jets - 2005.pdf260.48 kBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft