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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17689

Title: Perceptions of Perinatal Loss: Miscarriage versus Stillbirth
Authors: Plagge, Jane
Antick, Jennifer R.
Keywords: PERINATAL LOSS
PREGNANCY LOSS
MISCARRIAGE
STILLBIRTH
SOCIAL SUPPORT
Issue Date: Dec-2009
Publisher: UTSC Printing Services, University of Toronto Scarborough
Citation: Women's Health and Urban Life, Vol 8 (2), pg. 113-127
Abstract: Lack of social support lengthens and intensifies the grieving process for women experiencing perinatal loss and is a predictor of depression as long as a year after loss. Support appears to be offered differentially based on gestational age. This study represents an attempt to assess biases that might hinder support. Female university students’ perceptions of perinatal loss were ascertained using a hypothetical vignette about a close, personal friend who experiences either stillbirth (group 1) or miscarriage (group 2). They were all asked about expectations and beliefs as well as how they might personally react. The participants rating the stillbirth vignette reflected expectations of more grief and more personal discomfort than those rating the miscarriage vignette. The data from this study support previous findings regarding social support and perinatal loss. Limits, implications and future directions are discussed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17689
Appears in Collections:Social Sciences

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