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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17702

Title: ICAM-1 as a Novel Binding Partner for LPS to Mediate TLR4-Independent Cell Activation
Authors: Pabari, Reena
Advisor: Zhang, Haibo
Department: Physiology
Keywords: Lipopolysaccharide
ICAM-1
TLR4-Independent
Issue Date: 22-Sep-2009
Abstract: Introduction: The mechanism of cell activation by LPS in the absence of surface Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is unclear. We hypothesize that ICAM-1 binds LPS on the cell surface, mediating cell activation independent of TLR4. Methods: The interaction between murine ICAM-1 and LPS was measured in a binding assay. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) isolated from TLR4 deficient mice were stimulated with LPS. Cell activation was measured by flow cytometry and cytokine production. The role of ICAM-1 in cell activation was determined by siRNA transfection. Results: Murine ICAM-1 binds LPS. TLR4 deficient AMs respond to LPS stimulation by upregulation of LPS binding sites, ICAM-1 expression and cytokine release. Cell activation is attenuated by treatment with polymyxin B and ICAM-1 gene silencing. Conclusions: ICAM-1 binds LPS and is important in TLR4-independent cell activation. Strategies devised to target ICAM-1 may have the potential to block the excessive inflammatory response seen in gram-negative sepsis.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17702
Appears in Collections:Master

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