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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17703

Title: An Investigation of Ethylene Laminar Diffusion Flames at Sub-atmospheric Pressures to Simulate Microgravity
Authors: Panek, Natalie Marie
Advisor: Gulder, Omer L.
Department: Aerospace Science and Engineering
Keywords: Microgravity
Combustion
Issue Date: 22-Sep-2009
Abstract: Ethylene/Air diffusion flames were studied at sub and super-atmospheric pressures to simulate a microgravity environment at fuel flow rates of 0.482 mg/s and 1.16 mg/s. Flame properties including flame dimensions, soot formation, temperature, and attachment mechanisms were investigated. Overall, luminous flame height decreased with decreasing pressure to the point of visible luminosity disappearance, resulting in blue flames. Flame width increased with decreasing pressure until the flame was almost spherical. Soot formation decreased with decreasing pressure to negligible concentrations in a near vacuum. At 0.482 mg/s, the percentage of carbon converted into soot was between 0.01% and 0.12%, whereas at 1.16 mg/s, this percentage was between 0.5% and 11% at sub-atmospheric pressures. Maximum flame temperatures increased with decreasing pressure. Regardless of fuel flow rate, the diffusion flames remained attached to the exterior of the burner. This attachment point moved further down the burner exterior as pressure decreased until a near vacuum.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17703
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute for Aerospace Studies - Master theses

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