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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17705

Title: Mental Workload Measurement Using the Intersaccadic Interval
Authors: Pierce, Eldon Todd
Advisor: Fernie, Geoff
Green, Robin
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: mental workload
saccade
mental effort
eye movements
Issue Date: 22-Sep-2009
Abstract: Mental workload is commonly defined as the proportion of a person's total mental capacity in use at a given moment. A measure of mental workload would have utility in a number of rehabilitation medicine applications, but no method has been adequately examined for these purposes. A candidate measure is the intersaccadic interval (ISI), which is the duration between two successive saccades. Previous studies indicate that ISI length may be linked to mental workload, but this link is poorly understood for tasks that are not primarily visual. Therefore, the current study was an investigation of ISI and workload intensity in three non-visual tasks: mental arithmetic, verbal fluency, and audio perception. Workload was manipulated through changes in task difficulty as well as study participant motivation level. An analysis of eye movements and other experimental workload measures indicated a significant association between audio perceptual workload and ISI length.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17705
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering - Master theses

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