test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17712

Title: Surface Modification for Digital Microfluidic Devices
Authors: Shahrestani, Seyedeh Niko
Advisor: Mostaghimi, Javad
Wheeler, Aaron
Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Keywords: Digital Microfluidics
Sol-Gel
Issue Date: 22-Sep-2009
Abstract: Digital Microfluidics (DMF) is a new field of science and technology that introduces movement of nanoliter to microliter size droplets on patterned electrodes. Droplets can be moved, dispensed, merged, and split on devices. Sequential chemical reaction, and DNA extraction are examples of biological applications of DMF. In this thesis, sol-gel technology has been used as a coating method for thin film fabrication. Sol-gel is suitable for coating thin films with flexible shapes. BaTiO3 was used as a dielectric material for coating the insulator layer of the device. The material was spin coated on glass substrates. Devices were coated spinning at 500 rpm for 45 s, and annealed at 600 °C for 2hrs. The ceramic layer obtained, had a thickness of ~1 µm and average roughness of 60 nm. Nanoliter size droplets of water of ~400 nl were moved on the surface of the devices applying minimum voltage of 30 Volts.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17712
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Shahrestani_Seyedeh_N_200906_MASc_thesis.pdf.pdf3.67 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft