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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18078

Title: Multiculturalism and the De-politicization of Blackness in Canada: the case of FLOW 93.5 FM
Authors: McKenzie, Kisrene
Advisor: Razack, Sherene
Department: Sociology and Equity Studies in Education
Keywords: Canada
Black
identity
multiculturalism
radio
broadcasting
advertising
consumerism
music
Toronto
Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission
FLOW 93.5 FM
Milestone Radio
Broadcasting Act
African Canadians
government policy
communications
sociology
popular culture
capitalism
urban
CRTC
Canadian Broadcasting Company
CBC
history
new media
Facebook
Toronto District School Board
TDSB
Black History
Multiculturalism Act
hip hop
Black Canadians
Black community
law
radio license
systematic racism
critical discourse analysis
racist discourse
Denham Jolly
Milestone
Kanye West
nationalism
diversity
disc jockey
Black music
urban music
pop music
programming
Issue Date: 11-Dec-2009
Abstract: This thesis presents a case study of Canada’s first Black owned radio station, FLOW 93.5 FM, to demonstrate how official multiculturalism, in its formulation and implementation, negates Canada’s history of slavery and racial inequality. As a response to diversity, multiculturalism shifts the focus away from racial inequality to cultural difference. Consequently, Black self-determination is unauthorized. By investigating FLOW’s radio license applications, programming and advertisements, this thesis reveals just how the vision of a Black focus radio station dissolved in order to fit the practical and ideological framework of multiculturalism so that Blackness could be easily commodified. This thesis concludes that FLOW is not a Black radio station but instead is a multicultural radio station – one that specifically markets a de-politicized Blackness. As a result, multiculturalism poses serious consequences for imagining and engaging with Blackness as a politics that may address the needs of Black communities in Canada.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18078
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education - Master theses

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