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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18119

Title: Contextualizing Outcomes of Public Schooling: Disparate Post-secondary Aspirations among Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Secondary Students
Authors: Hudson, Natasha
Advisor: Restoule, Jean-Paul
Bascia, Nina
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: Aboriginal
Contexts of learning
Post-secondary aspirations
Youth
Public school
School-to-work transition
Social reproduction
Systemic inequality
Equality of opportunity
Bricolage
Structuration
Pragmatism
Programme for International Student Assessment
Youth in Transition Survey
Comparative education
Access to post-secondary schooling
Streaming
Indigenous
Native
First Nations
Métis
Inuit
Socio-economic status
Race
Gender
Location
Higher education
Canada
PISA
YITS
Assessment
Canadian
Meritocracy
Democracy
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: To understand how Aboriginal youths’ access to post-secondary schooling opportunities is created and constrained, structures of inclusion and exclusion are examined. In particular, the legitimization of unequal treatment and disparate outcomes is problematized; making the case that public schooling systems limit the opportunities of youth. In this study, youths’ post-secondary aspirations are contextualized on the basis of racial identity, gender, programs of enrolment, graduate destinations, parent’s level of schooling, parental income, and community size; binary analyses evaluate the relationships among these variables. The variables were accessed from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Findings of this research counter other studies that demonstrate Aboriginal youth with lower post-secondary opportunities relative to their peers. This study substantiates that barriers to aspiration achievement and post-secondary opportunities are not from a lack of ambition or academic preparedness among Aboriginal youth attending Canadian public schools.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18119
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology - Master theses

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