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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18121

Title: The Influence of Peer Relationships on Girls' Body Experiences Overtime
Authors: Mafrici, Nina
Advisor: Piran, Niva
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: body image
peers
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: Peer relationships encompass an important developmental context for young girls’ understanding of normative social behavior and appearances. In early adolescence, concern for peer acceptance intensifies, as do the rigid standards peers regulate and command for physical appearance. Pressure to conform to group norms of attractiveness leaves girls vulnerable to reduced self-esteem and body dissatisfaction. Based on the life history narratives of 10 pre- and post-pubertal girls of diverse backgrounds, experiences with peers as they relate to pressures and resistances towards appearance conformity are documented through a prospective design. Results support the presence of two highly integrated domains of the peer environment which promote the pervasiveness of appearance-related pressure and body-consciousness for girls transitioning into adolescence: the evaluative external gaze and concerns for peer acceptance. Protective factors are discussed in the context of girls’ friendships and their ability to distance themselves from peer appearance pressure.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18121
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology - Master theses

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