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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18122

Title: Preliminary Investigation of the Relationship Between Emotion Processing Variables and Difficulties in Affect Regulation With the Use of Affect Regulation Strategies
Authors: Recoskie, Kimberly
Advisor: Watson, Jeanne
Department: Adult Education and Counselling Psychology
Keywords: affect regulation
affect regulation strategies
difficulties in emotion regulation
emotion processing
improving negative affect
preliminary measure of affect regulation strategies
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: A preliminary measure of affect regulation strategies was developed from Parkinson and Totterdell’s (1999) provisional classification of deliberate strategies for improving negative affect. Four broad categories of strategies including Cognitive Engagement, Cognitive Diversion, Behavioural Engagement, and Behavioural Diversion were represented by the measure. Using this measure, relationships between self-reported use of affect regulation strategies and difficulties in emotion regulation and emotion processing variables were investigated. Participants included 186 adults. Participants completed a 20 minute online survey consisting of the measure of affect regulation strategies, the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Subjective Experience of Emotions Scale (SEE), and a demographic information questionnaire. Weak correlations were found for the majority of the difficulties in emotion regulation and emotion processing subscales and individuals’ self-reported use of affect regulation categories. Results also provide evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the DERS and SEE.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18122
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology - Master theses

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