test Browse by Author Names Browse by Titles of Works Browse by Subjects of Works Browse by Issue Dates of Works
       

Advanced Search
Home   
 
Browse   
Communities
& Collections
  
Issue Date   
Author   
Title   
Subject   
 
Sign on to:   
Receive email
updates
  
My Account
authorized users
  
Edit Profile   
 
Help   
About T-Space   

T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
School of Graduate Studies - Theses >
Master >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18128

Title: Quantitative Paleoclimate Reconstructions from the Melville Peninsula, Nunavut, Canada
Authors: Adams, Jennifer
Advisor: Finkelstein, Sarah A.
Department: Geography
Keywords: paleoclimatology
Arctic
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: A transitional climate and the presence of Thule sites make the Melville Peninsula an area of high importance for paleoenvironmental studies. Lake sediment cores and surface samples from Melville Peninsula were analyzed for diatom assemblages. Fragilarioid diatom species dominate assemblages from the interior of the peninsula since the middle Holocene. The greatest changes in diatom communities occurred during the transition from the Holocene Thermal Maximum to the Neoglacial, and in the post-Little Ice Age period. Species richness reached maximum values in the most recent period, reaching 50.8 species in surface sediments. Diatom-inferred pH reconstruction from two lakes did not indicate substantial change throughout the Holocene despite assemblage changes, showing the complexity of interpreting paleoclimate records dominated by Fragilarioids. Analysis of modern assemblages from the interior and East coast of Melville Peninsula confirm the importance of site size and water chemistry, as determined by bedrock geology, in determining diatom species distributions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18128
Appears in Collections:Master
Department of Geography - Master theses

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Adams_Jennifer_K_200911_MSc_thesis.pdf8.55 MBAdobe PDF
View/Open

Items in T-Space are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

uoft