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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18129

Title: Expressive Arts as a Social and Community Integration Tool for Adolescents with Acquired Brain Injuries
Authors: Agnihotri, Sabrina
Advisor: Keightley, Michelle L.
Colantonio, Angela
Department: Rehabilitation Science
Keywords: acquired brain injuries
expressive arts
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: Acquired brain injury (ABI) during adolescence presents even greater challenges to youth already facing complex issues in this transitory period. Studies have demonstrated that youth with ABI suffer from social and community withdrawal as a result of their injuries. However, a lack of research focusing on interventions designed to promote community integration has left the effectiveness of these programs difficult to assess. The current study aimed to collect pilot data about the effectiveness of an expressive arts-based therapeutic program in helping to improve community integration of these youth, as these therapies have been shown to be useful for individuals with similar cognitive and behavioural issues. Results over 2 stages of testing suggest that expressive arts therapy is a promising intervention strategy to help promote social and community integration skills. The findings also suggest that more research is needed to develop improved measures of community integration for adolescents with ABI.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18129
Appears in Collections:Master
Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science - Master theses

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