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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18133

Title: Computerized Provider Order Entry: Initial Analysis of Current and Predicted Provider Ordering Workflow
Authors: Alcide, Niiokai
Advisor: Etchells, Edward
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Keywords: Workflow
CPOE
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: Background: Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) allows providers to enter medication and service orders electronically. Workflow analysis is a critical component of CPOE implementation. Objectives 1. To develop a nosology for provider ordering workflow. 2. To describe actual provider ordering workflow focusing on chart and computer usage 3. To model the impact of computerized ordering on provider workflow in three future state scenarios Method: 20 hours of participant observation was performed for nosology development, time motion studies totaling 47 and predictive modeling projected effects of possible implementation scenarios Results/Conclusions: Unique nosology was developed. Clinicians spent 27% of their time with the patient, 2.2% writing orders and 1.1% locating patient charts. Our study predicted that the E-All scenario (computerization of all orders) would be the best implementation choice. Limitations: Small sample size (25 clinicians), participant frame of reference and other assumptions may have affected the results of this study.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18133
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering - Master theses

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