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T-Space at The University of Toronto Libraries >
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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18134

Title: Design and Implementation of Ground Support Equipment for Characterizing the Performance of XPOD and CNAPS & Thermal Analysis of CNAPS Pressure Regulator Valve
Authors: Ali, Mohamed
Advisor: Zee, Robert E.
Department: Aerospace Science and Engineering
Keywords: nanosatellite
satellite
Issue Date: 14-Dec-2009
Abstract: As the potential uses of nanosatellites become apparent, their numbers keep increasing. This is evident at the Space Flight Laboratory (SFL) located at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies which has seen a rapid growth in satellite missions in recent years. By leveraging the use of the Generic Nanosatellite Bus developed at SFL, satellites can be rapidly developed to carry science payloads or demonstrate the capabilities of new technologies on orbit. Testing satellite systems in an Earth environment is an important step in qualifying them for space. This thesis describes the development of ground support equipment for testing SFL’s nanosatellite separation system, XPOD, and characterizing the performance of the propulsion system, CNAPS. Also, the thermal behaviour of a pressure regulator valve on CNAPS is examined for various flow conditions.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18134
Appears in Collections:Master
Institute for Aerospace Studies - Master theses

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